Skiing in February

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We are trying to figure out where all the snow has gone this year. It sure ain’t easy to find. A bunch of friends had just an awful time at Whistler over the Thanksgiving and Washington conditions are terrible. But, here are some of the options we are looking at:

  • RSN. This is just a great summary site with conditions and everything. Of course, they won’t tell you that 16 inches of snow at Deer Valley are just terrible, but I think we can all guess that 🙂
  • Sun Peaks. A bunch of our friends were going to go to this place because the snow is better. Only issue is that there isn’t that much snow up there. About 29 inches right now and it is mainly a skiing oriented place vs. Whistler. The best place for kids to stay appears to be according to Delta Sun Peaks Resort thanks to its pool and hot tubs. Does require 3 night stay during the winter break though. See Sun Peaks Reservations for more details.
  • Whistler Blackcomb. Where everyone goes. Has the most amenitites, but according to Jeff, not the super best snow. On the other hand, there is 48 inches on the ground there right now. They had 12 inches just overnight!, but of course it is incredibly expensive. C$500-700/night. Wow!

6 Replies to “Skiing in February”

  1. Have you ever skied Red Mountain and & Granite Mountain here in Rossland? we’re having a bad snow year this year but we expect it to be fine in the new year. You can keep an eye on the snow pack at Ski-Red.com If you decide to come up this way to do some skiing in the new year do lwet me know and I’ll buy you a beer/cofee and introduce you to some awesome local skiers.

  2. Sounds great. I’ll keep an eye out for these places.
    Would love to buy you a beer and also ask you about your broadband project. Was fascinated to hear about the politics of breaking a duopoly. Do you think that there is a need for a third provider now that Shaw and Telus are supplying service.
    We’ve been exploring that as an investment idea.

  3. Yes and it is in the works. The telecommunications Crossroads study you looked at was done in ’99 The recommendations made in it led to the formation of a volunteer organization called THe Kootenay Boundary Communications Network (KBCN) and I did a lot of work for them investigating some possihilities. They eventually morphed into an official non-profit organization the Columbia Mountain Open Network (CMON) for which we were hired to do a business case and an RFP for a massive wireless network spanning 147 communities in the East and West Kootenays. While that network is unlikely to see the light of day CMON is involved in a number of projects some of which involve FTTH.
    We need a 3rd network here to really force down bandwidth prices. Additionally Shaw has not completed their build from the Okanagan to Trail so they do not have a really good backbone in the region and what they do have is primarily for the use of their cable operation and their cable Internet customers.
    What the existence of CMON, for which Brian Tim and myself can take the large part of the credit for, did was force Telus and Shaw to start offering their services in the 12 largest communities in the region in a (hopefully futile) attempt to stacvew off the competitioon that an open access non-profit network committed to offering fully converged services, would present to them. I truly hope CMON can pull some of their plans off. It will be nothing but good for the region.

  4. BTW I fixed the accept the HTML part in MovableType. Look forward to reading the memo and maybe we can an entrepreneur or two give you a call.

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